So how safe is that data in the Cloud?

For home use most of us have data stored in the cloud: Gmail/Hotmail and possibly a GoogleDocs, Skydrive or icloud account for file storage and backing up settings for our mobile devices.

For years we have been telling clients that the Cloud is also a business option, but the ability to get at your data is so much more crucial in a business environment that you need to consider how to get data back if the cloud provider fails.

Megaupload is a good example. The service was used to store all sorts of data, legitimate and not so legitimate and yet it has been shut down by one country taking action against people who do not reside there and against servers that are not in that country. All the legitimate individuals who used it for file storage cannot access their data, even though the cloud provider wants them to be able to. No warning, no chance to download before shutdown, no-one to appeal to, just gone and no idea if they will ever get anything back.

If you are considering business in the Cloud consider:

•    who you deal with (do you trust them to manage data transfer if they are going under),

•    where they store the data (can you get a court order to get it back if they have gone under) and

•    how you can take copies of your data onto your own premises just in case.


Norman Johnston
"The most powerful motivating factor for employees is seeing tangible progress whilst performing meaningful work. Effective information Technology achieves this objective."

Norman Johnston
Think I.T. Team

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